You are here

8 Things to Do on Canada’s West Coast

Published 14 July 2016

Angela Griffin

Angela Griffin

The mountains and lakes of Canada’s dramatic west coast draw outdoors enthusiasts in their droves. In summer the lakes glitter with canoeists and swimmers, the mountains throng with hikers and bear spotters and the seas fill with whale watchers. In winter the pure white landscape brings skiers, snowboarders and snow-shoers to the region, while Northern Lights fans head to Arctic Canada with the hope of glimpsing the fabled aurora.

You could spend months here and barely scratch the surface, but we’ve chosen eight of our favourite things to do in this truly spectacular corner of the globe.

Orca, British Columbia

Go whale watching in Vancouver

Between April and October, thousands of whales swim past Vancouver on their annual migration route. Take a zodiac boat, paddle a kayak or even ride a seaplane to the Gulf and San Juan Islands near Vancouver and look for orcas, humpbacks, gray and minke whales, as well as the odd porpoise, seal or puffin. Vancouver Island itself is home to a resident pod of around 100 orcas, with prime viewing time between May and October when they feed off migrating salmon in the Strait of Georgia.

Rocky Mountaineer

Ride the Rocky Mountaineer train

One of the world’s most beautiful train rides, the historic Rocky Mountaineer winds its way through the Rocky Mountains from Vancouver to Jasper or Banff, with detours possible to Calgary and Whistler. All trips spend two days onboard the train, with a night in Kamloops to split the journey. Onboard, huge floor-to-ceiling glass panels allow everyone to take in the constantly changing views of snow-capped peaks and plunging waterfalls that greet each twist and turn.

Yukon landscape, Canada

Get away from it all in the Yukon

An otherworldly land of ice and snow, rugged mountain scenery and deep canyons, the Yukon is like no other place on earth. Most visitors arrive in Whitehorse or pass through on their way to Alaska, but linger awhile for an adventure like no other. Try Kluane National Park for canoeing, fishing, dog sledging and grizzly bear watching, or stop in Whitehorse for museums and the SS Klondike sternwheeler, now a national historic site.

Skiing in Whistler

Ski the slopes in Whistler

Perhaps the most famous ski resort in the world, Whistler’s reputation as a powder paradise precedes it. Indeed, with over 8,171 acres of ski runs, 37 lifts and 200 trails, there’s plenty to choose from, and a vast array of hotels bars and restaurants too. And if downhill’s not your thing you can always try snowshoeing, sleigh riding, snowmobiling or cross-country skiing, while in summer there’s rafting, climbing, hiking and riding the Whistler-Blackcomb gondola up for grabs.

Walking in Banff

Go hiking in Banff

Surrounded by some of the most striking scenery in the world, Banff is the ideal spot to try some hiking in the Rocky Mountains. With many trails accessed from the town itself, it couldn’t be easier: grab your hiking boots, pick up a free map from the Visitor Center and set off at your own pace. Try the mile-long Fenland Trail around the First Vermilion Lake, where you might spot ospreys and bald eagles, or for something a little more challenging hike up Tunnel Mountain, a three-mile return climb that provides fabulous views over the mountains and the Bow River below.

Northern Lights, Canada

Watch the Northern Lights dance

Between December and March the dark skies above northern Canada are prime aurora borealis watching territory. This dazzling night time display is best viewed away from light pollution, so the wilderness of the Yukon and the Northwest Territories is ideal; try the lodges and huts around Whitehorse for a cosy viewing spot. That said, the phenomenon can be glimpsed as far south as Prince George in British Columbia and Edmonton in Alberta.

Spirit Bear, Canada

Search for bears in the Great Bear Rainforest

In remote British Columbia stands the Great Bear Rainforest, a collection of towering cedar and spruce trees home to cougars, wolves, grizzly bears and the magnificent Kermode, or spirit, bear, a subspecies of the black bear. Due to a genetic throwback, one in ten of all spirit bears are white, making them a fascinating and rare wildlife spot. Your best bet is to stay at the lovely Spirit Bear Lodge and join the resident guides for walks and boat trips among the waterfalls and valleys in search of these elusive creatures.

Icefields Parkway, Canada

Drive the Icefields Parkway

Otherwise known as Highway 93 North, the Icefields Parkway is a 144-mile route from Jasper to Lake Louise, passing though both Jasper and Banff National Parks. Surely one of the world’s best drives, its mountain, glacier and lake scenery is exceptional. It takes about four hours to drive, but you’re best off making a day of it, giving you the chance to follow the trails and stop at the viewpoints you’ll pass along the way. One particular highlight is a ride out onto the Athabasca Glacier in an all-terrain Ice Explorer, which stops to let you have a little walk on the ice.

Fancy exploring west coast Canada and Vancouver? Give our Experts a call today or take a look at our tailor-made Canada Journeys.

You might also like:

10 of the Best Things to Do in Canada

5 Tips for Driving Canada's Icefields Parkway

Featured in this blog:

Select an option below to contact one of our experts now, about anything you need

Alternatively, you can email us, request a call back, or live chat with a consultant

Call free on 0800 707 6010

We're open every day from:
9:00am to 8:00pm Mon-Fri
9:00am to 6:00pm Sat
10:00am to 5:00pm Sun and Public Holidays

We're open every day from:
9:00am to 8:00pm Mon-Fri
9:00am to 6:00pm Sat
10:00am to 5:00pm Sun and Public Holidays

Send us your number and we'll call you back.

Your details

When would you like us to call you?
Your details:

Your details

When would you like us to call you?
When would you like us to call you?
Add additional information?
Speak to us about:
Discuss a Trip List

Live Chat